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The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck
 224 Seiten

Plus: The audiobook has a great narrator. At the core, this book has a set of substantial ideas and truths.

Not for me: I became tired of the constant "fucks" very quickly. I feel like I have outgrown this youthful language (in a boring way, not in an "I'm too classy" way).

I think this book can be a great pointer to recalibrate the values in your life. Personally, I just didn't like the packaging.

↑ 2022
2021 ↓
Artificial Intelligence
 336 Seiten

A great (layperson's) overview of the current state of the field of A.I., with an introduction to the technology, a summary of the limitations, and some pointers to more literature. A great introduction to everyone who doesn't necessarily want to learn how to build AI themselves, but wants to understand the core technology. It's not the best format for an audiobook, though: The narrator's voice is a little monotonic and there are many references to the 40+ figures in the book that don't come across when you only listen to the audio.

& Rebuilding Reliable Data Pipelines Through Modern Tools
 97 Seiten

Kompakte Übersicht über das Thema "Data Engineering": Was bedeutet es, eine "Data Pipeline" aufzubauen, worauf muss man achten? Prinzipiell interessant, aber leider bleibt der Autor sehr unkonkret und nennt wenig echte Beispiele. Für Entwickler:innen ist es meiner Meinung nach zu abstrakt, für "Manager:innen" setzt es dann doch zu viel technisches Verständnis voraus. Ich verstehe die Zielgruppe nicht so richtig, ich selbst war zumindest nicht Teil davon. Naja, es war ein kostenloses ebook, dafür war es okay.

The Infinite Machine
 352 Seiten

A book about the origin story of Ethereum. I read this as a way to challenge my assumption that a) cryptocurrencies are pointless hype and b) that anyone who says 'crypto will revolutionize the world' just uses this as an excuse to speculate in 'get rich.

I understand now that ethereum does have a very interesting core idea: a distributed computer that you can run "code" on, which typically means creating a token that has certain effects when it is bought or sold. Alright, not completely pointless then. I am still not convinced that any of the distributed applications that I've heard of actually need to be implemented that way. Big money speculation seems to be the primary driver, still in 2021. So there is definitely a big hype that still needs to settle down to see what role this technology will play in the future.

In any case, the (audio) book was a pleasant narration of the story and I liked it.

Fatherland
 424 Seiten

A political thriller set in an alternative post-war Berlin where the Nazis had won the war. This was Robert Harris‘ first novel after he had researched the stories of the forged Hitler Diaries in the 1980s. He clearly succeeded in mixing history and fiction – I for one was quite captivated by the story.

, & Machine Learning Design Patterns
 408 Seiten

This was the book I needed to take me one step further: From just knowing "how to train a neural network" to a better understanding of "MLOps", including training workflows, aspects of scalable serving, and reproducibility.

The three authors are employed at Google and it shows in many chapters: The example of choice is always a Google Cloud AI offering or a Tensorflow code snippet. They do make an effort to also mention competitor products and open source alternatives. Because their insight from Google provided them with this wide range of best practices, I won't hold any of this against the book.

The book isn't without its flaws, though. This (recent) first edition has a number of distracting errors (such as misleading numbers in figures and weird code indentation), plus the greyscale print makes it hard to read many of the figures. That fact cost the book its fifth star. A 2nd edition will probably catch up once it irons out these issues.

I for one will keep this book on my shelf for future reference. It's a great collection of best practices to move a team and an organization ahead in terms of "AI readiness".

Code Girls
 336 Seiten

Interesting retelling of the stories surrounding the female US code breakers of WW2. I learned some things about the war in the Pacific that I didn't know before. It was mostly straight-forward though: The stories of how (mostly) women were recruited to break ciphers for the army and the navy, some explanation on basic code breaking principles, embedded in the chronological development of the war and its effect on American society. I didn't like the audio version too much, to be honest. The narration was a little robotic and a bit slow for my taste. In retrospect, I think I would have preferred the paper version.

Invisible Women
 432 Seiten

Highlighting the gender data gap: The absence of information and mechanisms required to make life fair for both genders.

Caroline Criado Perez shows how "male" is almost always the norm and "female" the exception - from the workplace over the size of smartphones to medical research.

The data she presents draws a sobering picture of inequality across all areas of life. A very important book.

↑ 2021
2020 ↓
Mythos
 448 Seiten

The first time I really leaned into Greek mythology. Stephen Fry does a great job at retelling the myths, providing humor and context so that the stories stick. It's still a lot, so I won't remember all of it. This may also be because I listened to the audiobooks so I couldn't earmark or highlight certain chapters or characters. Still, Stephen Fry reads it himself, so I would definitely recommend the audio version. He's definitely my favorite person to read any audiobook in the English language.

Selling Hitler
 400 Seiten

Wow, what a story.

I was only vaguely aware of the publishing scandal surrounding the "Hitler diaries" in 1983. The Hamburg-based magazine Stern had spent millions to fetch them through one of their journalists who in turn received them from a dealer that managed to acquire them from East Germany. Except: None of this was true and honest. The Stern management had committed to the deal behind their editors' back, the journalist kept half the money for himself (and spent lavishly on Hitler memorabilia) and the dealer in fact did not acquire the "diaries", but obediently forged them one by one as more money kept pouring in.

I couldn't stop reading. This story has everything and raises some interesting questions aside from the story itself: To what lengths do we go to deceive ourselves if we desire for something to be true? How easy do we calm our inquisitory and skeptic nature if an authority we trust has provided us with enough plausible explanations, even if they themselves have been deceived due to a series of mistakes and oversights?

Robert Harris wrote this book in 1986, briefly after the whole story had collapsed. I do not know what additional information has come to light in the 30+ years since, so this book may in fact be a little out of date. Also, I would have wished for a little transparency on how Harris was able to reconstruct the series of events, down to individual conversations. If the book has shown me one thing, it is to be skeptical of someone's narration of events, as long as the source isn't validated completely. What remains is a little uncertainty as to which assumptions Harris had to make to be able to tell it in such a cohesive and compelling manner. In any case, a book well worth reading if the story interests you.

How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming
 288 Seiten

The story of astrophysicist Mike Brown whose calling it is to observe the skies, trying to find new objects in our solar system. When he finds one particular object, the space community has come to grips with the fact that Pluto may actually not be a planet - and what exactly is a planet anyways?

Extremely entertaining, and sometimes shocking to learn about the politics of "who saw it first". I liked it a lot.